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POET LAUREATE INTERVIEW WITH DAMILOLA OJIKUTU

The poet laureate is easily one of our biggest events as a community. Just as the Nobel Prize is bestowed on an individual who has done exceptionally well in a particular field, with the poet laureate, we seek to honour and crown an outstanding creative every year.

We make sure that our themes border on heavy African narratives. For last year, we had “sankofa yenkyi”, a Ghanaian word from the Akan tribe that means “it is not wrong to go back for that which you have forgotten.”

african futurism

Call For Submissions: Africanfuturism!

 

Nnedi Okorafor defines Africanfuturism as “a sub-category of science fiction that is similar to ‘Afrofuturism’ but more deeply rooted in African culture, history, mythology, and point-of-view as it then branches into the Black diaspora, and it does not privilege or center the West.” 

Here at TVO TRIBE,

We believe Africanfuturism transcends science fiction. We want interested writers, poets, scribblers, and artists to explore what Africanfuturism specifically means to them. Do you think Africa is evolving or not? What are your projections for Africa? We want you to create timeless pieces by making a blend of African culture, history, myths, and literature. 

In the month of May,

TVO tribe will be talking about Africanfuturism. We will attempt to explore all of its mysterious depths and lay bare its many hidden layers. You are an important part of this discussion, and so we urge you to join us.

Dissect this theme with us.

Write your opinions laden with facts about Africanfuturism, express yourself artistically by making submissions relating to the theme. Write to us aesthetics, contents, and everything that lies in between. TVO TRIBE is a safe space and we are open to everyone. We accept articles, poems, personal accounts, stories, creative nonfiction, and photos that relate to the theme.

We want to read your fears, the things that please you, your beautiful writings, the ones that are stuck in your throat like a fishbone. Show us the pieces you think are deviants and the ones that conform to rules. Send us everything you have!

We encourage you to be as expressive as possible, stylistically pleasing while creating aesthetic pieces as your submission. Please check our submission guidelines for further details.

Submit to: contributions@tvotribe.com

Deadline: 1st May, 2021

For more info, please visit: www.tvotribe.com/contributions

gerontocracy in africa

Sugar Cubes

SUGAR CUBES           || Ibiteye Overcomer

Ballot boxes are metaphors for sugar cubes:

Dazzling, inviting, brides of anthills.

Glazed cartons holding frail fragments

of truth, justice, sweetness, of anthills.

Brazen walls of power that makes their builders vulnerable,

or is it the builders that make themselves vulnerable?

Could it be that between the petulant layers of history

and the creamy strands of change,

brittleness is being used as cement?

Ballot boxes are metaphors for sugar cubes:

Bright, luminous,

dissolving on the tongues of thugs and grey-haired godfathers.

Dissolving into nothingness.

This land swallows colors and spits out shadows.

Feeble legs walk on corridors of power with

walking sticks,

while youthful lips are forced to mold into silence

and writhe beneath the whispers of fear.

Threnodies of the sixties on replay,

withered policies of the seventies on display,

masses left to do nothing but pray.

Yet, every morning, I stand by my window and watch

as the sun rises,

as it ignites hope in me.

A hope that one day, we’ll rise in our youthful agility,

flex our fingers

and rip out the brittleness in our sugar cubes,

that we’ll repair the creaky staircases of power

and climb up to leadership,

that doggedly, without compromise,

we’ll chase the anthills away.

BIO

Ibiteye Overcomer is a twenty-year-old Nigerian. She is an avid reader and a poet who uses poetry as a means to express her views and thoughts about pressing matters with ease. You will find her on Instagram @bimolaovercomer.

Read also: 4 African Authors You Didn’t Know Were Imprisoned For Activism